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Booker Prize Longlist

Ok, so the Booker Prize long list announcement was made two days ago, but I've been hither and tither, with one thing and another. Certainly no surprise to see Julian Barnes on the list - for the third time - maybe this will be the year that he will be the groom, as opposed to the long standing best man. Ok, so that analogy doesn't quite work - I didn't want to emasculate him by using the bride/bridesmaid cliche (!) so I should be given some points for that at least. Anyway, here's the full list:

Julian Barnes The Sense of an Ending (Jonathan Cape - Random House)
Sebastian Barry On Canaan's Side (Faber)
Carol Birch Jamrach's Menagerie (Canongate Books)
Patrick deWitt The Sisters Brothers (Granta)
Esi Edugyan Half Blood Blues (Serpent's Tail)
Yvvette Edwards A Cupboard Full of Coats (Oneworld)
Alan Hollinghurst The Stranger's Child (Picador - Pan Macmillan)
Stephen Kelman Pigeon English (Bloomsbury)
Patrick McGuinness The Last Hundred Days (Seren Books)
A.D. Miller Snowdrops (Atlantic)
Alison Pick Far to Go (Headline Review)
Jane Rogers The Testament of Jessie Lamb (Sandstone Press)
D.J. Taylor Derby Day (Chatto & Windus - Random House)

Apologies if the formatting of the list is skewed; best I can do as I'm on the move. I have to admit to having read none of them. I was close to buying Miller's Snowdrop a little while ago but wasn't sufficiently intrigued by the couple of pages I read - although that's no real basis on which to judge it. Out of all these though the two I want to read first are Sebastian Barry's On Canaan's Side and Patrick deWitt's The Sisters Brothers. The latter's publisher - Granta - has made available the first chapter here. deWitt certainly seems to have generated the same type of buzz that D B C Pierre's Vernon God Little made before it won a good few years back. Barry is an easy favourite for me - not least because I championed his previous book The Secret Scripture, which missed out on the Booker to Adiga's The White Tiger in 2008. Barry then went onto win the Costa.

Location:Chiswick, London

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